The Easternmost Scavenger Hunt!

A few weeks ago, the Three Seas students headed to Lubec, Maine, the easternmost point in the continental United States. Part of their coursework for the Marine Invertebrate Zoology ad Marine Botany course involved the annual Cobscook Bay intertidal scavenger hunt. Students were given 2 hours to find as many invertebrates and algae, then spent the next 4 hours identifying them. The 5 groups collected and identified more … Continue reading The Easternmost Scavenger Hunt!

Celebrating Biodiversity with Bioblitzes – Coast to Coast

(Cross-posted from Ocean Genome Legacy News) In the past year, Ocean Genome Legacy (OGL) has been recruiting people from all walks of life to help document and preserve the deep offerings of our oceans. On September 10, you can too! OGL co-hosted Bioblitzes across the country with citizen scientists and future leaders in marine biology. These biodiversity-themed events provide opportunities for folks to explore, identify, … Continue reading Celebrating Biodiversity with Bioblitzes – Coast to Coast

I get paid to do this?! Working as a teaching assistant in Panama.

There are three main ways that you get paid as a graduate student, and they can vary semester to semester: 1. You can have your own funding source via a scholarship. 2. You can work as a research assistant on one of your advisor’s funded projects. 3. You can work as a teaching assistant (TA) for a class. I’m currently getting paid by option number … Continue reading I get paid to do this?! Working as a teaching assistant in Panama.

Thank Goodness It’s Friday…Harbor!

OGL and Three Seas Record Biodiversity in the Pacific Northwest (Cross-posted from Ocean Genome Legacy news) For Ocean Genome Legacy (OGL) and Northeastern University’s Three Seas Program, the pristine rocky shores and dazzling kelp forests of Puget Sound are real-world “classrooms” where young marine scientists are making biodiversity discoveries and promoting conservation. This spring, OGL and Three Seas teamed up to conduct an educational “bioblitz” survey of marine … Continue reading Thank Goodness It’s Friday…Harbor!

Caught in the act: RISE 2014

Earlier this month was Northeastern University’s Research Innovation and Scholarship Expo. Students from across all disciplines presented their work to the public. If you missed it, I recommend going next year where you can learn about everything from sustainable architecture to robotic bees (a personal favorite). Here’s Lara (a fellow blogger and second from the left) at the event where she served as a judge: She joined a team … Continue reading Caught in the act: RISE 2014

Three Cheers For…!

The past month has brought a lot of good news, recognition, and mile-stones for the hard-working graduate students here at the MSC. First and foremost, a congratulations to a student who made it “across the finish line” and successfully defended their thesis. On April 11th, Catherine Matassa defended her PhD dissertation on how “Ecological context shapes the response of consumer to predation risk”. Job well done! … Continue reading Three Cheers For…!

Cash for Corals: Crowdfunding at the MSC

One major goal of this blog is to bring academia out of the ivory tower and into the public eye. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: researchers cannot exist in a vacuum. Scientific knowledge belongs to the world; it affects everyone and influences nearly every aspect of life. Now, before you start thinking I’m priming to champion some grad student socialist crusade, … Continue reading Cash for Corals: Crowdfunding at the MSC