Celebrating Biodiversity with Bioblitzes – Coast to Coast

(Cross-posted from Ocean Genome Legacy News) In the past year, Ocean Genome Legacy (OGL) has been recruiting people from all walks of life to help document and preserve the deep offerings of our oceans. On September 10, you can too! OGL co-hosted Bioblitzes across the country with citizen scientists and future leaders in marine biology. These biodiversity-themed events provide opportunities for folks to explore, identify, … Continue reading Celebrating Biodiversity with Bioblitzes – Coast to Coast

Striped Bass – the Ultimate Predator, Gamefish, and Meal

Every year, millions of beach-goers swim in the same waters as one of New England’s top predators. No, it’s not the infamous White Shark and no, it wouldn’t (and couldn’t) ever harm a person. I’m talking about the voracious, elusive, and delicious Striped Bass.  The cousin of White Perch and White Bass, Striped Bass can grow to over 4 feet in length and are considered … Continue reading Striped Bass – the Ultimate Predator, Gamefish, and Meal

There’s a New Crab Investigator in Town

(Cross-posted from Ocean Genome Legacy News) Asian shore crabs, a highly invasive species, first appeared on the coast of New Jersey in the late 80s and have since spread up and down the East Coast. This winter, a talented high school student named Margaret “Maggie” Slein and her science teacher, Raymond Whitehouse, came to the Ocean Genome Legacy (OGL) at the Northeastern University Marine Science … Continue reading There’s a New Crab Investigator in Town

I get paid to do this?! Working as a teaching assistant in Panama.

There are three main ways that you get paid as a graduate student, and they can vary semester to semester: 1. You can have your own funding source via a scholarship. 2. You can work as a research assistant on one of your advisor’s funded projects. 3. You can work as a teaching assistant (TA) for a class. I’m currently getting paid by option number … Continue reading I get paid to do this?! Working as a teaching assistant in Panama.

First grade gratitude takes the sting out of winter

From toddlers to retirees, my motto is that the science bug can bite you at any age, and so its never too early to start getting young scientists out into the field exploring nature! Boston Public Schools teacher Naomi Mulvihill agrees, and that’s why we were both so jazzed to work together this fall to plan a Marine Science Center field trip for Naomi’s first graders from the Sarah … Continue reading First grade gratitude takes the sting out of winter

To Live Deliberately: Two Weeks Exploring Marine Habitats with COSA

by Andrew Madanjian Growing up, my family was not the “outdoorsy” type. I’ve always loved going to the beach, but aside from that I’ve been more comfortable indoors—movie theaters, art museums, book stores. Although I’m now a fourth year biology major, for most of my youth I was averse to exploring nature and getting dirty. I begin my post with this preface to accentuate how … Continue reading To Live Deliberately: Two Weeks Exploring Marine Habitats with COSA

Biodiversity Treasure Hunt on Martha’s Vineyard

(Cross-posted from Ocean Genome Legacy news) What better place to study ocean life than an island? That’s why the Ocean Genome Legacy (OGL) crew packed up our buckets and headed to the quaint fishing village of Menemsha, Martha’s Vineyard, at the end of July to host the first annual Bioblitz on Menemsha Beach. OGL’s Bioblitz, our biodiversity scavenger hunt, was a splashing success, with many … Continue reading Biodiversity Treasure Hunt on Martha’s Vineyard