Striped Bass – the Ultimate Predator, Gamefish, and Meal

Every year, millions of beach-goers swim in the same waters as one of New England’s top predators. No, it’s not the infamous White Shark and no, it wouldn’t (and couldn’t) ever harm a person. I’m talking about the voracious, elusive, and delicious Striped Bass.  The cousin of White Perch and White Bass, Striped Bass can grow to over 4 feet in length and are considered … Continue reading Striped Bass – the Ultimate Predator, Gamefish, and Meal

I get paid to do this?! Working as a teaching assistant in Panama.

There are three main ways that you get paid as a graduate student, and they can vary semester to semester: 1. You can have your own funding source via a scholarship. 2. You can work as a research assistant on one of your advisor’s funded projects. 3. You can work as a teaching assistant (TA) for a class. I’m currently getting paid by option number … Continue reading I get paid to do this?! Working as a teaching assistant in Panama.

To Live Deliberately: Two Weeks Exploring Marine Habitats with COSA

by Andrew Madanjian Growing up, my family was not the “outdoorsy” type. I’ve always loved going to the beach, but aside from that I’ve been more comfortable indoors—movie theaters, art museums, book stores. Although I’m now a fourth year biology major, for most of my youth I was averse to exploring nature and getting dirty. I begin my post with this preface to accentuate how … Continue reading To Live Deliberately: Two Weeks Exploring Marine Habitats with COSA

Presented Live, from Palmer Station, Antarctica!

By Sandi Scripa “How cold is it outside?” “Is it true that Antarctica used to be tropical?” “How bad do the elephant seals smell?” “How many people live in Antarctica? Are there penguins there?” The fourth, fifth, and sixth graders at Johnson Elementary School in Nahant had many exciting questions for Dr. William Detrich, as he chatted with the students via Skype earlier this week … Continue reading Presented Live, from Palmer Station, Antarctica!

Report from the Field: Phragmites australis

By Forest Schenck What’s in a name? The Greek or Latin roots of a scientific name often describe some unique or defining characteristic of the species in question. For instance, the etymology of Phragmites australis reveals that the genus name is derived from the Greek word phragma meaning hedge or fence and the species name (australis) means southern in Latin. Likewise, species common names are … Continue reading Report from the Field: Phragmites australis

Field Notes: Out with the New, in with the Old… and then Back in with the New?

Sometimes fieldwork goes exactly how you planned, however, most of the time you end up getting to Plan C before anything starts working. Let me tell you about my week of making all the plans and changing them over, and over, and over again. For the next 5-7 weeks, I am running an experiment at Mote Marine’s Tropical Research Lab (TRL) in Summerland Key, FL, … Continue reading Field Notes: Out with the New, in with the Old… and then Back in with the New?

What’s Inside a DNA Bank? A Tour of the Ocean Genome Legacy Center

By Charlotte Seid, Biorepository Manager at OGL You may have visited a museum or an aquarium, but how about a DNA repository? The MSC’s Ocean Genome Legacy Center is home to over 23,000 DNA samples from many of the ocean’s strangest, rarest, and most threatened creatures. Why do we collect DNA? The genetic material of life holds valuable information about each species’ unique adaptations, its … Continue reading What’s Inside a DNA Bank? A Tour of the Ocean Genome Legacy Center