Seaweed-scles!

Admittedly, when I first moved here I had a heat-centric view of temperature stress in the rocky intertidal. I am from southern California, and when the temperatures go up and the tide go out, critters cook on the rocks!

Upon moving to the Boston area, in the middle of winter, my idea of temperature stress quickly changed… a quick foray onto the rocks in January and I saw frozen intertidal! All the fleshy algae were “crunchy” due to a thin layer of ice and some organisms were frozen in pools turned to ice.

Although last winter was mild, this winter has provided some pretty cold weather. Last week when I went to collect seaweed and snails for the marine biology lab I once again found myself in a frozen intertidal…

Ice layer in the high intertidal
Ice layer in the high intertidal
Frozen tide pool
Frozen tide pool
Barnacles entombed in ice
Barnacles entombed in ice
Ulva intestinalis in a frozen pool
Ulva intestinalis in a frozen pool
Thin layer of ice coating Fucus
Thin layer of ice coating Fucus
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